Hebrew Word Definitions
By Jeff A. Benner

Anger | Atonement | Bless | Break | Brother | Command | Covenant | Earth | Eternity | Face | Faith | Family | Father | Fear | Firmament | Firstborn | Fringe | Glory | God | Good | Goodnews | Gracious | Heart | Hell | Holy | Keep | Know | Law | Life | Lord | Love | Messiah | Mother | Name | One | Peace | Praise | Pray | Priest | Righteous | Shine | Son | Soul | Spirit | Truth | Wilderness | Word | Worship

This word is a good example that demonstrates the concrete nature of the Hebrew Language. This is the Hebrew word for a "nose," or "nostrils" when written in the plural form (naphiym), but can also mean "anger." When one becomes very angry, the nostrils start flaring. A literal interpretation of 1 Samuel 20:34 is, "And Jonathon rose from the table with a burning nose," where the phrase "burning nose" means a "fierce anger." Strong's: 639

The Hebrew word kaphar means "to cover over," but is often translated as atonement. The word atonement is an abstract word and in order to understand the true Hebrew meaning of a word we must look to the concrete meaning. If an offense has been made, the one that has been offended can act as though the offense is covered over and unseen. We express this idea through the word of forgiveness. Atonement is an outward action that covers over the error. Strong's: 3722

The Hebrew verb barak means to kneel as seen in Genesis 24:11. However, when written in the piel form it means to show respect (usually translated as bless) as seen in Genesis 12:2. A related Hebrew word is berakhah meaning a gift or present. From this we can see the concrete meaning behind the piel form of the verb barak. It is to bring a gift to another while kneeling out of respect. The extended meaning of this word is to do or give something of value to another. Elohiym "respects" us by providing for our needs and we in turn "respect" Elohiym by giving him of ourselves as his servants. Strong's: 1288

The verb parar is often translated as "break," as in "Do not break the commands of Elohiym." This word does not mean "disobey," as we often perceive it, but something much more concrete. Each Hebrew word is a picture of action. In this case, the picture is an ox treading on the grain on the threshing floor to open up the hulls to remove the seeds. To the Ancient Hebrews, breaking the commands of Elohiym was equated with throwing it on the ground and trampling on it. A child who disobeys his parents, but is genuinely apologetic, shows honor and respect to his parents. But a child who willfully disobeys with no sign of remorse has trampled on his parents teachings and deserves punishment. Strong's: 6565

The first letter is the picture of an ox. As the ox is strong, the letter also has the meaning of strong. The second letter is the picture of a tent wall. The wall is a wall of protection which protects what is inside from what is outside. When combined these letters form the word meaning "the strong wall" and represents the "brother" as the protector of the family. Strong's: 251

The word command, as well as commandment, are used to translate the Hebrew word mits'vah but does not properly convey the meaning of mits'vah. The word command implies words of force or power as a General commands his troops. The word mits'vah is better understood as a directive. To see the picture painted by this word, it is helpful to look at a related word, tsiyon (which is also the name Zion) meaning a desert or a landmark. The Ancient Hebrews were a nomadic people who traveled the deserts in search of green pastures for their flocks. A nomad uses the various rivers, mountains, rock outcroppings, etc as landmarks to give them their direction. The verbal root of mits'vah and tsiyon is tsavah meaning to direct one on a journey. The mits'vah of the Bible are not commands, or rules and regulations, they are directives or landmarks that we look for to guide us. Strong's: 4687

While the Hebrew word beriyt means "covenant" the cultural background of the word is helpful in understanding its full meaning. Beriyt comes from the parent root word bar meaning grain. Grains were fed to livestock to fatten them up to prepare them for the slaughter. Two other Hebrew words related to beriyt and also derived from the parent root bar can help understand the meaning of beriyt. The word beriy means fat and barut means meat. Notice the common theme with bar, beriy and barut, they all have to do with the slaughtering of livestock. The word beriyt is literally the animal that is slaughtered for the covenant ceremony. The phrase "make a covenant" is found thirteen times in the Hebrew Bible. In the Hebrew text this phrase is "karat beriyt". The word karat literally means "to cut". When a covenant is made a fattened animal is cut into pieces and laid out on the ground. Each party of the covenant then passes through the pieces signifying that if one of the parties fails to meet the agreement then the other has the right to do to the other what they did to the animal (see Genesis 15:10 and Jeremiah 34:18-20). Strong's: 1285

The Hebrew word often translated as "earth" is "erets," but is more frequently translated as "land" which is the more literal meaning of the word. The word erets may refer to land in general or a specific piece of land, or region, such as in the "land of Israel." This word comes from the root "rats" (Strong's 7518) meaning "fragment." When a clay pot is broken it is not wasted. The broken fragments, called ostracon, are commonly used for writing letters, receipts, messages, etc Strong's: 776

Hebrew words used for space are also used for time. The Hebrew word qedem means "east" but is also the same word for the "past." The Hebrew word olam literally means "beyond the horizon." When looking off in the far distance it is difficult to make out any details and what is beyond that horizon cannot be seen. This concept is the olam. The word olam is also used for time for the distant past or the distant future as a time that is difficult to know or perceive. This word is frequently translated as "eternity" meaning a continual span of time that never ends. In the Hebrew mind it is simply what is at or beyond the horizon, a very distant time. A common phrase in the Hebrew is "l'olam va'ed" and is usually translated as "forever and ever," but in the Hebrew it means "to the distant horizon and again" meaning "a very distant time and even further." Strong's: 5769

This Hebrew word is a plural noun meaning "face." As most words in the Hebrew language expresses the idea of motion, this plural noun conveys the ideas of mood, emotions and thoughts, the different motions reflected in the face. This Hebrew word more precisely means the "presence" or the "wholeness of being" of an individual. Strong's: 6440

The Hebrew root aman means firm, something that is supported or secure. This word is used in Isaiah 22:23 for a nail that is fastened to a "secure" place. Derived from this root is the word emun, meaning craftsman. A craftsman is one who is firm and secure in his talent. The feminine form of emun is the word emunah meaning firmness, something or someone that is firm in their actions. When the Hebrew word emunah is translated as "faith," as it often is, misconceptions of its meaning occur. Faith is usually perceived as a knowing while the Hebrew emunah is a firm action. To have faith in Elohiym is not knowing that Elohiym exists or knowing that he will act, rather it is that the one with emunah will act with firmness toward Elohiym's will. Strong's: 530

The word "mishpahhah," meaning family comes from the root "shaphahh," meaning "to join." The family is a group joined together where each role in the family serves a specific function to keep the family joined together. Strong's: 4940

In the original pictographic script, the first letter is a picture of an ox. As the ox is strong, the letter also has the meaning of strong. The second letter is the picture of the tent or house where the family resides. When combined, these letters form the meaning "the strength of the house." Strong's: 1

The root meaning of the word yara is "to flow" and is related to words meaning rain or stream as a flowing of water. In Hebrew thought fear can be what is felt when in danger or what is felt when in the presence of an awesome sight or person of great authority. These feelings flow out of the person through their actions, such as shaking when in fear or bowing down in awe of one in authority. Strong's: 3372

The word raqiya comes from the root word raqa which can be found in several passages including Isaiah 40:19 - "The idol! a workman casts it, and a goldsmith overlays it with gold, and casts for it silver chains." The word "overlay" is the verb root raqa. Raqa is the process of hammering out a piece of gold or other metal into thin plates which was then applied to a carved or molten image. Numbers 16:39 reads "So Eleazar the priest took the bronze censers, which those who were burned had offered; and they were hammered out as a covering for the altar." Here, the phrase "were hammered out" is again the verb root raqa. The gold was hammered into thin sheets then laid over the surface of the alter. The word raqiya is the noun form of the verb raqa and is literally a "hammered out sheet". There are some scientists who have speculated that before the flood there was a thick sheet of water surrounding the earth up in the atmosphere. It is then possible that the "floodgates of heaven were opened," at the beginning of the flood, is the collapse of this "hammered out sheet" of water. It is estimated that the sheet of water would have filtered out harmful sun rays and contributed to the longevity of life on earth before the flood. Strong's: 7549

The firstborn of the father receives a double portion of the inheritance as well as being the leader of his brothers. However, if a son other than the firstborn receives this inheritance, he is called the "firstborn." Interestingly, this is a very common occurrence within the Biblical text such as we see with Jacob and Ephraim. Strong's: 1060

In Numbers 15:38-40 God commands Israel to put fringes (tsiytsiy in Hebrew) on the corner of their clothes so that they will remember to do the commands of the torah. As the Hebrew mind focuses on the concrete, God uses physical things as reminders and associations for non-physical things. In this case the fringes are reminders of the commands. The word tsiytsiyt is derived from the root tsiyts meaning a blossom. A blossom is a flower that grows on a tree and is the beginning of the fruit. Just as the blossom turns into a fruit, the fringes on the Hebrews garments are also there to bring about fruit in the sense of doing the commands. Strong's: 6734

In Exodus 16:7 we read "and in the morning you shall see the glory of the LORD" (RSV). What is the "glory" of YHWH? First we must recognize that the "glory" is something that will be seen. Secondly, the word "glory" is an abstract word. If we look at how this word is paralleled with other words in poetical passages of the Bible, we can discover the original concrete meaning of this word. In Psalm 3:3 the kavod of Elohiym is paralleled with his shield and in Job 29:20, Job's kavod is paralleled with his bow. In Psalm 24:8 we read "who is this king of the kavod, YHWH is strong and mighty, YHWH is mighty in battle." The original concrete meaning of kavod is battle armaments. This meaning of "armament" fits with the literal meaning of the root of kavod, which is "heavy," as armaments are the heavy weapons and defenses of battle. In the Exodus 16:7, Israel will "see" the "armament" of YHWH, the one who has done battle for them with the Egyptians. Strong's: 3519

When reading the Bible it is better to have an Ancient Hebrew perception of Elohiym rather than our modern western view. The word el was originally written with two pictographic letters, one being an ox head and the other a shepherd staff. The ox represented strength and the staff of the shepherd represented authority. First, the Ancient Hebrews saw Elohiym as the strong one of authority. The shepherd staff was also understood as a staff on the shoulders, a yoke. Secondly, the Ancient Hebrews saw Elohiym as the ox in the yoke. When plowing a field two oxen were placed in a yoke, one was the older more experienced one, and the other was the younger and less experienced. The younger would then learn from the older. The Hebrews saw Elohiym as the older experienced ox and they as the younger that learns from him. Strong's: 410

The first use of this word is in Genesis chapter one where Elohiym calls his handiwork "good" (as it is usually translated). It should always be remembered that the Hebrews often relate descriptions to functionality. When Elohiym looked at his handiwork, he did not see that it was "good," he saw that it was functional-"like a well oiled and tuned machine." Strong's: 2896

The verbal root of this word means "to bring good news." What does good news and flesh have in common? Flesh, or meat, was normally only eaten on very special occasions, a feast, the arrival of guests or whenever an event occurs that requires a celebration. Strong's: 1320

This verb is often translated as "to be gracious" or "have mercy," however these are abstract terms and do not help us understand the meaning of this verb from an Hebraic perspective, which always relates words to something concrete. One of the best tools to use to find the more concrete meaning of a word is to look at how that word is paralleled with other words in poetical passages. In the book of Psalms the word Hhanan is paralleled with "heal," "help," "raise up," "refuge" and "give strength." From a concrete Hebraic perspective, חנן means all of this, and no English word can convey the meaning of the Hebrew, but we could sum up its meaning with "providing protection." Where would a nomadic Hebrew run for protection? The camp, which in the Hebrew language is the word mahhaneh (Strong's # 4264), a noun related to Hhanan. Strong's: 2603

To the ancient Hebrews the heart was the mind, the thoughts. When we are told to love Elohiym with all our heart (Deut 6:5) it is not speaking of an emotional love, but to keep our minds and our thoughts working for him. The first picture in this Hebrew word is a shepherd staff and represents authority, as the shepherd has authority over his flock. The second letter is the picture of the floor plan of the nomadic tent and represents the idea of being inside, as the family resides within the tent. When combined they mean "the authority within". Strong's: 3820

The word she'ol was understood as the place where one goes when they die. Was this simply the grave one is buried in, or a place one goes too after they die? This is a difficult question to answer as the Hebrew Bible never really defines she'ol. There is evidence however that they understood it to be more than just the grave. First, the word qever is the normal Hebrew word for a grave and therefore, it is possible that she'ol was understood as something other than the grave. Second, most scriptures using the word she'ol imply a place other than the grave. An example can be found in Genesis 37:35 where Jacob says "I will go down to my son in she'ol." In this account Jacob believed his son Joseph had been eaten by a wild beast and could therefore not be in a grave, yet Jacob knew that he would be with him somewhere-she'ol. The Ancient Hebrews did not know where, or even what, she'ol was. To them it was an unknown place hence. The word she'ol literally means "unknown." It should also be noted that the Ancient Hebrews never speculated on something unknown, it was simply not known and left at that. It is only the Greek mind that desires to know the unknown. It is our Greco-Roman western mindset that needs to know where and what she'ol is. Strong's: 7585

This word is frequently translated as "holy," another abstract word. When we use the word holy, as in a holy person, we usually associate this with a righteous or pious person. If we use this concept when interpreting the word holy in the Hebrew Bible, then we are misreading the text, as this is not the meaning of the Hebrew word qadosh. Qadosh literally means "to be set apart for a special purpose". A related word, qedesh, is one who is also set apart for a special purpose but not in the same way we think of "holy," but is a prostitute (Deut 23:17). Israel was qadosh because they were separated from the other nations as servants of Elohiym. The furnishings in the tabernacle were also qadosh, as they were not to be used for anything except for the work in the tabernacle. While we may not think of ourselves as "holy," we are in fact set apart from the world to be Elohiym's servants and his representatives. Strong's: 6918

The image painted by the Hebrew word shamar is a sheepfold. When a shepherd was out in the wilderness with his flock, he would gather thorn bushes to erect a corral to place his flock in at night. The thorns would deter predators and thereby protect and guard the sheep from harm. The word shamiyr, derived from this root means a thorn. The word shamar means to guard and protect and can be seen in the Aaronic blessing, May Yahweh respect you and guard you. One keeps the commands of Elohiym by guarding and protecting them. Strong's: 8104

The idea of "knowing" in Ancient Hebrew thought is similar to our understanding of knowing but is more personal and intimate. We may say that we "know" someone but simply mean we "know" of his or her existence, but in Hebrew thought, one can only "know" someone if they have a personal and intimate relationship with them. In Genesis 18:19 Elohiym says about Abraham, "I know him" meaning he has a very close relationship with Abraham. In Genesis 4:1 it says that Adam "knew Eve his wife" implying a very intimate relationship. Strong's: 3045

To interpret the Hebrew word torah as law is about the same as interpreting the word father as disciplinarian. While the father is a disciplinarian he is much more and in the same way torah is much more than law. The word torah is derived from the root yarah meaning to throw. This can be the throwing of a rock, the shooting of an arrow, or the pointing of the finger to show direction. Another word derived from this root is the word moreh, which can mean and archer, one who throws the arrow, or a teacher, as one who points the way. The word torah is literally the teachings of the teacher or parent. When a parent is teaching a child a new task and he demonstrates a willingness to learn, but fails to grasp the teaching completely, the parent does not punish the child, but rather encourages him. In contrast to this, a law is a set of rules that if not observed correctly, will result in punishment, and there is no room for teaching. The torah of Elohiym are his teachings to his children which are given in love to encourage and strengthen. Strong's: 8451

The Hebrew word hhai is usually translated as life. In the Hebrew language all words are related to something concrete or physical, something that can be observed by one of the five senses. Some examples of concrete words would be tree, water, hot, sweet or loud. The western Greek mind frequently uses abstracts or mental words to convey ideas. An abstract word is something that cannot be sensed by the five senses. Some examples would be bless, believe, and the word life. Whenever working with an abstract word in the Biblical text it will help to uncover the concrete background to the word for proper interpretation. How did the ancient Hebrew perceive "life?" A clue can be found in Job 38:39, "Will you hunt prey for the lion and will you fill the stomach of the young lion?" In this verse the word "stomach" is the Hebrew word hhai. What does the stomach have to do with life? In our culture it is very uncommon for anyone to experience true hunger but this was an all too often experience for the Ancient Hebrews. To the Ancient Hebrews life is seen as a full stomach while an empty stomach is seen as death. Strong's: 2416

The Hebrew word adon is one who has authority over another or as it is usually translated, a "lord" and is used in the Bible for both men and God. However, from a Hebraic perspective, a "lord" is not one who simply rules over another, but rather one who provides for and protects those under his charge. At this point, a little Hebrew grammar is in order to help understand what the Hebrew behind the word "Lord" really means. Strong's: 113

We do not choose our parents or siblings, but are instead given to us as a gift from above, a privileged gift. Even in the ancient Hebrew culture ones wife was chosen. It is our responsibility to provide and protect that privileged gift. In our modern Western culture love is an abstract thought of emotion, how one feels toward another but the Hebrew meaning goes much deeper. As a verb this word means "to provide and protect what is given as a privilege" as well as " to have an intimacy of action and emotion". We are told to love Elohiym and our neighbors, not in an emotional sense, but in the sense of our actions. Strong's: 157

The word Messiah is a transliteration of the Hebrew word meshiahh. This word comes from the root mashahh meaning "to smear" as in Jeremiah 22:14 where it is usually translated as "painted". In the ancient world olive oil was a very versatile commodity. It was used in cooking and because of its disinfectant quality, it was used as a medicine. No shepherd was without a flask of olive oil, which he smeared on himself, or his sheep's injuries. The verb mashahh is also translated as "anointed", as in Exodus 29:7, in the sense of smearing olive oil on the head. This ceremony was performed on anyone becoming a king, priest or prophet in the service of YHWH. The noun meshiahh literally means, "One who is smeared with oil for an office of authority." This word is also used for any "one who holds an office of authority" even if that person was not literally smeared with oil. A good example of this is Cyrus, the King of Persia. While he was not ceremonially smeared with oil, he was one of authority who served Yahweh through his decree allowing Israel to return to Jerusalem. Strong's: 4899

In the original pictographic script, the first letter is a picture of an ox. As the ox is strong, the letter also has the meaning of strong. The second letter represents water. The two letters give us the meaning of "strong water." The Hebrews made glue by boiling animal skins in water. As the skin broke down, a sticky thick liquid formed at the surface of the water. This thick liquid was removed and used as a binding agent-"strong water". This is the Hebrew word meaning "mother", the one who "binds" the family together. Strong's: 517

When we see a name, such as "King David" we see the word "King" as a title and "David" as a name. In our western mind a title describes a character trait while a name is simply an identifier. In the Hebrew language there is no such distinction between names and titles. Both words, King and David, are descriptions of character traits. The Hebrew word melekh (king) is "one who reigns," while daviyd (David) is "one who is loved". Both of these words are titles, describing the character of David. It is also common to identify the word "Elohiym" (Elohiym) as a title and YHWH (Yahweh) as a name. What we do not realize is that both of these are character traits. YHWH is both a word and title meaning "one who exists" and Elohiym is a word and a title meaning "one who has power and authority". The Hebrew word "shem" more literally means "character". When the Bible speaks of taking Elohiym's name to the nations, he is not speaking about the name itself but his character. When we are commanded to not take Elohiym's name in vain, this literally means not to represent his character in a false manner. This is similar to our expression, "have a good name," which is not about the name itself but the character of the one with that name. Strong's: 8034

The word ehhad (noun) comes from the verbal root ahhad meaning "to unite." Ehhad is best translated with the word "unit," something that is part of the whole, a unit within a community. In the Hebrew mind everything is, or should be, a part of a unity. There is not one tree but a tree composed of units within the unity-roots, trunk, branches and leaves. A tree is also in unity with the other trees-the forest. A son is a unit within the brotherhood and the family. Strong's: 259

When we hear the word peace, which this word is usually translated as, we usually associate this to mean an absence of war or strife. However, the Hebrew word shalom has a very different meaning. The verb form of the root word is shalam and is usually used in the context of making restitution. When a person has caused another to become deficient in some way, such as a loss of livestock, it is the responsibility of the person who created the deficiency to restore what has been taken, lost or stolen. The verb shalam literally means to make whole or complete. The noun shalom has the more literal meaning of being in a state of wholeness, or being without deficiency. The Biblical phrase "shalu shalom yerushalayim" (pray for the peace of Jerusalem) is not speaking about an absence of war (though that is part of it), but that Jerusalem, and by extension all of Israel, be complete and whole and goes far beyond the idea of "peace". Strong's: 7965

The Hebrew verb halal means "to shine" as can be seen Job 29:3. But when it is written in its piel form it means "commend" (usually translated as "praise"). However, commend is an abstract word that must be understood through the ancient Hebrew's concrete way of thinking. The North Star, unlike all of the other stars, remains motionless and constantly shines in the northern sky and is used as a guide when traveling. In the Ancient Hebrew mind we praise Elohiym by looking at him as the guiding star that shines to show us our direction. Strong's: 1984

In our modern religious culture prayer is a communication between man and Elohiym. While this definition could be applied to some passages of the Bible (such as Genesis 20:17) it is not a Hebraic definition of the Hebrew word palal. By looking at the etymology of this word we can better see the Hebraic meaning. The word palal comes from the parent root pal meaning "fall" (The root pal is most likely the root of our word fall which can etymologically be written as phal). Pal is also the root of the Hebrew word naphal also meaning "fall". The word palal literally means to "fall down to the ground in the presence of one in authority pleading a cause". This can be seen in Isaiah 45:14 where the Sabeans fall down and make supplication (this is the Hebrew word palal) to Cyrus. Strong's: 6419

While the priests of Israel were the religious leaders of the community this is not the meaning of the word kohen. The Hebrew word for the priests of other nations is komer from a root meaning burn and may be in reference to the priests who burn children in the fires of Molech (2 Kings 23:10). The word kohen comes from a root meaning a base such as the base of a column. The koheniym (plural of kohen) are the structural support of the community. It is their responsibility to keep the community standing tall and straight, a sign of righteousness. Strong's: 3548

This word is often translated as "righteous," an abstract word. In order to understand this word from an Hebraic mindset, we must uncover its original concrete meaning. One of the best ways to determine the original concrete meaning of a word is to find it being used in a sentence where its concrete meaning can be seen. The problem with the word tsadiyq, and its verb form tsadaq, is that there are no uses of this word in its concrete meaning. The next method is to compare how the word in question is paralleled with other Hebrew words as commonly found in the poetical passages of the Bible. Sometimes these parallels will be synonyms and other times antonyms. When we look at the word tsadiyq we find that it is commonly paralleled with the word "rasha". Rasha is usually translated as "wicked" but has a concrete meaning of "to depart from the path and become lost". From this we can conclude that a tsadiyq is one who remains on the path. The path is the course through life which Elohiym has outlined for us in his word. Strong's: 6662

The word 'or, as a noun means "light" and as a verb, it means to "give light" or "shine." It is also related to the idea of bringing order, in the same way that you bring about order in the darkness when you turn on the lights. Strong's: 216

In the original pictographic script, the first letter a picture of a tent or house. The second letter is the picture of a seed. The seed is a new generation of life that will grow and produce a new generation therefore, this letter can mean "to continue." When combined these two letters form the word meaning "to continue the house" and is the Hebrew word for a "son." Strong's: 1121

In the Hebrew mind, we are composed of a multiple of entities: flesh, bone, breath, mind, emotion, organs, etc. The soul is the whole of the person, the unity of the body, breath, and mind. It is not some immaterial spiritual entity; it is you, all of you, your whole being or self. This idea of the soul is used in our own language such as when the number of persons on a aircraft or ship are identified as souls, as in "one hundred souls on board." Strong's: 5315

The Hebrew word ru'ach literally means the wind and is derived from the parent root rach meaning a prescribed path. The word rach is not found in the Biblical text but defined by the various child roots derived from it. The child roots derived from this parent root are arach, rachah and yarach. Arach is a traveler, one who follows a prescribed path from one place to another. Rachah is a millstone, which goes round and round in the sense of following a prescribed path to crush grain into flour. Yarach is the root of yere'ach meaning the moon, which follows a prescribed path in the night sky. The child root ru'ach is literally the wind that follows a prescribed path each season. By extension ru'ach means the wind of a man or what is usually translated as spirit. A man's wind is not just a spiritual entity within a man but is understood by the Ancient Hebrews as his character. Strong's: 7307

The root of this word is aman, a word often translated as "believe," but more literally means "support," as we see in Isaiah 22:23 where it says "I will drive him like a peg in a place of support..." A belief in Elohiym is not a mental exercise of knowing that Elohiym exists but rather our responsibility to show him our support. The word "emet" has the similar meaning of firmness, something that is firmly set in place. Psalms 119:142 says, "the "Torah" (the teachings of Elohiym) is "emet" (set firmly in place). Strong's: 571

For forty years Elohiym had Israel wander in the "wilderness." Insights into why Elohiym had chosen the wilderness for their wanderings can be found in the roots of this word. The root word is "davar" and is most frequently translated as "speak," but more literally means to "order" or "arrange" words. The word "midbar" is a place existing in a perfectly arranged order, an ecosystem in harmony and balance. By placing Israel in this environment he is teaching them balance, order and harmony. Strong's: 4057

The meaning of "words" are an ordered arrangement of words. Closely related to this word is the feminine word devorah, which is a bee. A bee hive is a colony of insects that live in a perfectly ordered society. Another closely related word is midbar, which is a wilderness. A wilderness is a place in perfect balance or order. Strong's: 1697

In our modern western culture worship is an action directed toward Elohiym and Elohiym alone. But this is not the case in the Hebrew Bible. The word shahhah is a common Hebrew verb meaning to prostrate oneself before another in respect, or simply, obeisance. We see Moses doing this to his father-in-law in Exodus 18:7. From a Hebraic perspective obeisance is the act of getting down on ones knees and placing the face down on the ground before another worthy of respect. Strong's: 7812

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